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The Wildlife Photographer Of The Year 2020 Winners Have Just Been Revealed.

The Wildlife Photographer Of The Year 2020 Winners Have Just Been Revealed.

After around 49000 entries for the Wildlife Photography Competition were whittled down to just a few, the Duchess of Cambridge announced the winners. Russian photographer Sergey Gorshkov has won the prestigious Wildlife Photographer of the Year award for an image of an Amur tigress hugging a tree.

These are some of the photos taken from the incredible world we live in and were taken in the Wildlife Photography Competition in 2020. Winners of the competition were announced by the Duchess of Cambridge in an online live stream from the Natural History Museum.

It had several categories related to wildlife and every category had winners who had the best of the photographs. The photographs were amazing and you couldn't believe looking at them and the exact moments they were captured on.

A picture of a tiger hugging a tree was crowned the Grand Title Winner. The title of this photo is 'The Embrace' and it shows an Amur tiger, also known as Siberian tiger, hugging an ancient fir tree. The photographer behind this was Sergey Gorshkov and it took him more than 11 months to capture it using hidden cameras. The picture was so shockingly deep which showed how these animals find companions and such other things.

 

Wildlife Photographer of the year 2020

 

 

Having tracked this great grey owl’s every move for weeks, Jonas set out in his car, on the night of a full moon, to capture a photograph of the bird. When he spotted his subject, Jonas cast his headlights towards it and sneaked into the forest. He caught the owl raising its claw, poised to attack a vole.

 

Night Hunter By Jonas Classon

 

 

Another winner was Liina Hekkinen, who was 13 years old when she took this award winning photo of a fox. It was in the category Young Grand Title Winner. And its title was 'The fox that got the goose.' This hungry fox had feathers in its mouth, dragged away the goose that their mother had brought to her and was clearly refusing to share it with their siblings.

 

Wildlife Photographer of the year 2020

 

'A mean mouthful' is the title of this image of this clownfish and is captured by Sam Sloss, who won the 11-14 years old category. According to Sam, he took the photo while on a diving holiday in Indonesia. He was always fascinated by the clown fishes as they swam around and he saw one who always had their mouth open and captured it instantly.

 

Wildlife Photographer of the year 2020

 

This squid's image won the 'Under Water category'. Photographer Songda was the one behind the beautiful shot and he was diving in the Philippines when he caught this photo of a diamondback squid.

 

Wildlife Photographer of the year 2020

 

Gabriel Eisenband won the Plants And Fungi category in the awards. His award winning photo was incredibly amazing and was named as "Out Of The Blue". Gabriel was aiming for another photo but this scene caught his eyes and he captured the senecio species, a member of the daisy family found only in Colombia. 

 

Wildlife Photographer of the year 2020

 

Mogens Trolle won the Animal Portraits category with a calm and composed posing photo of a male proboscis monkey. The title of the image is "The Pose". The monkey looks as if he is having a moment of meditation. These monkeys are known for their long noses and are only found on the island of Borneo and nearby islands and they are endangered too.

 

Wildlife Photographer of the year 2020

 

A scientist caught this bat during a biodiversity survey. When Piotr spotted the parasite on the bat’s head, his interest was immediately aroused and he quickly started to take photographs for research. Piotr didn’t have much time before the bat was released, but he did manage to capture the bristles and claws of its firmly attached stowaway.

 

Big Bat Bloodsucker By Piotr Naskrecki

 

The Urban Wildlife Winner, Alex Badyaev presented a photo titled "Watching You Watching Them" in which the flycatcher has built a nest just outside his remote research cabin. Luckily for him, they were the very species he wanted to study. So as not to disturb the birds, the biologist hid his camera behind a large piece of bark on a tree. And directed a flash towards the trunk and used to operate the set-up from inside and watch them too.

 

Wildlife Photographer of the year 2020

 

Read more: Wildlife photographer waits six days to take a panther shadow picture in the Indian forest.

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