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This woman’s fingers turn pale white due to a rare condition called Raynaud's Syndrome.

This woman’s fingers turn pale white due to a rare condition called Raynaud's Syndrome.

Pictures of this woman’s hands have gone viral after depicting what it's like living with an extremely rare disorder that leaves some of her fingers completely white.

Recently, a 23-year-old girl Julie shared a picture of her mother’s hands showing pale white fingers. The post was captioned,
“Is it not the freakiest thing you've ever seen?”
Her mother, Monica, suffers from Raynaud's Syndrome which is a rare disorder of the blood vessels. The vessels become narrow when a person is cold or feeling stressed. As a result, blood is unable to get to the surface of the skin, meaning the affected areas turn white and blue. As a result, blood is unable to get to the surface of the skin, meaning the affected areas turn white and blue.

 

 

The girl explained whenever it's cold outside and her mum doesn't wear gloves, her fingers go completely white and she is no longer able to feel them.
Since she took to social media to share what her mother faced, it has racked up more than 32,000 likes and more than a thousand comments, with many social media users saying they have the same disorder.

 

 

Julie said,

“My mum suffers from a condition known as Raynaud's Syndrome and has had it for around 20 years. It causes the blood vessels in her fingers to narrow so blood can't get to the surface of the skin, causing them to go completely white and numb. This usually happens to my mum in winter or when there's a sudden drop in temperature. It's definitely at its worst in January. Sometimes gloves help but if it's anything below two-three degrees, it'll happen regardless if she's wearing them or not.”


That is not even the worst part, once the feeling and color begin to return to Monica's fingers, she is left in a lot of pain.
Julie explained,

“She describes the feeling as horrendous pins and needles, at its best she describes it as uncomfortable and at its worst, it's very painful. It normally takes around an hour or so for the pain to stop and for the full feeling to come back.”

 

 

Monica has been suffering from the condition for two decades now. So now, she knows when it's about to start - and that it typically affects the two fingers in the middle of both hands, but can sometimes happen to all of her fingers.

 

 

Julie said,

“When she knows it's about to start and she's at home, she will put her hands in warm water to prevent it but of course, that's not possible when she's outside, which is when it happens most often.”


As far as her post is concerned, she was not expecting such an overwhelming response. Although she received a lot of unsolicited advice, she was amazed at how people with the condition came forward and explained what they go through.

Also read: A woman from Leeds declares her decision of marrying a 93-year-old Chandelier named Luminere.

Article and Image Source: LadBible

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