×
Rare White Moose With No Pigment Is Spotted By A Man In Sweden.

Rare White Moose With No Pigment Is Spotted By A Man In Sweden.

According to National Geographic, the condition is known as piebaldism and has also been seen in moose in Alaska and Canada.

A rare white moose has been found near Värmland in Sweden. The unique animal is born with a genetic condition that gives its fur no pigment. 
Roger Brendhagen, 52, was the one to spot the white moose when he was out for a walk through the countryside near Värmland. Roger is a wildlife photographer who said that 'he was delighted to come across the animal as around 30 white moose live in the area'. 

 

 

"I have met thousands of moose in my life but when I met this guy in the Swedish forests, I almost lost my senses but thank God I did not lose the camera," he said. 
The native of nearby Oslo, Norway, further shared that the animal's eyes, beaks, and claws can have normal pigmentation.
"The animal can become lighter, partly white or completely white in color, however, eyes, beak, and claws often have normal pigmentation, in contrast to albinism," Brendhagen explained. 

 

The moose's whiteness does not come from albinism but is the result of a recessive gene that can cause the animal to grow white fur with specs of brown, or - in rare cases - an entirely white coat. According to National Geographic, the condition is known as piebaldism and has also been seen in moose in Alaska and Canada.

 

 

Unlike albinism, piebaldism, which comes under the umbrella term leucism, sees an animal losing its pigment in fur, feathers, or scales but not in its eyes. About thirty white moose are believed to live in the area. The rare specie has also been spotted in Alaska and Canada. 

 

 

Also Read: Bull Shark Spotted In Floodwaters Just Metres From Homeowner's Back Fence In South-east Queensland.

Source: Daily Mail UK

Recommended for you