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In An Effort To Contain Coronavirus, Chinese City Of Shenzhen Imposes Ban On Eating Of Cats And Dogs.

In An Effort To Contain Coronavirus, Chinese City Of Shenzhen Imposes Ban On Eating Of Cats And Dogs.

Chinese city Shenzhen is taking the steps necessary to control the spread of Covid-19. The draft prepared contains the list of animals that are permitted to be used which includes pork, beef, chicken, rabbit, fish, and seafood. But it excludes pets such as cats and dogs.

1. Complete ban on the consumption of wild animals following the Covid-19  outbreak

 

Reuters

 

In an effort to implement a complete ban on the consumption of wild animals following the Covid-19  outbreak, Shenzhen has also imposed the ban on eating cats and dogs as a part of this nationwide drive.  The new regulations were published by the standing committee of the Shenzhen People's Congress

2. "White list"

 

Reuters

 

The draft officially includes the list of 9 types of meat that are allowed to be used by the public while the government has not said when it will vote on the measures. The list includes pork, beef, and chicken along with rabbits, fish, and seafood. But it excludes pets such as cats and dogs, as well as other popular dishes in southern China like snakes, turtles, and frogs. For now, the list is labeled the "white list"

3. "Blacklist" won't be published for now

 

Reuters

 

Reportedly the "blacklist"  won't be published for now because China has tens of thousands of different species of wild animals and it was impossible to be exhaustive.

The impose comes with the ban on trading and consumption of wild animals, a practice that has been blamed for helping to spread the coronavirus that causes Covid-19.
 

4. Tianjin city has also imposed similar ban

 

Reuters

 

According to the reports, those who fail to comply with the rules will be fined with 20,000 yuan. The report said that eating farmed animals that did not appear on the white list would also be banned because it would be too difficult to tell whether meat had been farmed or poached.

The Chinese appetite for a wide range of animals has long been controversial with epidemiologists linking the severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) epidemic that has killed more than 800 people worldwide 17 years ago to civet cats, a species commonly eaten in southern China.

About 10 days ago, Tianjin, the port city near Beijing, also passed a new regulation outlawing the capture, trading, farming, transport, and consumption of wild animals.

5. Wildlife protection law 1989

 

Reuters

 

China's existing wildlife protection law was enacted in 1989 but the law was filled with loopholes as on certain grounds it allowed the trading and consumption of wild animals for commercial purposes.

Source 

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