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'Eat Dirt': Consuming A Spoonful Of Soil Everyday Might Be The Cure For Obesity

'Eat Dirt': Consuming A Spoonful Of Soil Everyday Might Be The Cure For Obesity

Scientists at the University of South Australia accidentally found that one particular kind of clay binds to fat and carries it out of the body better than a weight-loss drug.

A spoonful of sugar could possibly enable the medicine to go down the throat, Mary Poppins wasn't a doctor, after all, however, something significantly less agreeable may now enable you to shed those extra pounds. Specialists from Australia have discovered obese rodents who ate a particular kind of clay lost more weight than those that were given a weight reduction drug. 

Source: Pixabay (For representational purposes only)

 

While eating mud may have been around since the time of ancient Greeks, famous personalities like Shailene Woodley (on-screen actor) and Elle Macpherson have brought the trend of eating dirt back in popular mass, the Daily Mail reports. Geophagy – its official name – is practiced around the world and is most common with pregnant ladies and youngsters.

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The eating of non-nourishment things is categorized as a dietary problem in numerous societies and is known as Pica. The 2015 narrative Eat White Dirt took a gander at how Southerners chow down on kaolin, a white clay framed from mineral deposits. 

Source: Maxpixels (For representational purposes only)

 

Moreover, Kaolin can be found in the anti-diarrhea drug Kaopectate. In any case, it wasn't from devouring mud, but instead, unintentionally the analysts from the University of South Australia went to their disclosure in the wake of endeavoring to discover mixes which could improve the manner in which the body ingests antipsychotic pills. 

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Tahnee Dening, a Ph.D. candidate said, "I noticed that the clay particles weren’t behaving as I’d expected. Instead of breaking down to release drugs, the clay materials were attracting fat droplets and literally soaking them up. Not only were the clay materials trapping the fats within their particle structure, but they were also preventing them from being absorbed by the body, ensuring that fat simply passed through the digestive system."

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"It’s this unique behavior that immediately signaled we could be onto something significant – potentially a cure for obesity," she added. Dening and her fellow specialists tried their hypothesis by feeding a gathering of rodents high-fat diets in addition to one of three enhancements: the weight reduction drug, orlistat, a clay called montmorillonite or a placebo. 

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Those that ate the mud supplement put on the least weight, proposing it was greater at flushing weight than the affirmed medications. Orlistat, on the other hand, prevented the rodents' bodies from processing fat.

They currently want to attempt the two in a blend.  While past research on geophagy hasn't discovered huge dangers to eating clay with some restraint, an excessive amount of could cause clogging.

Source: Maxpixels (For representational purposes only)

 

The analysts realize they could have a revolutionary diet drug staring them in the face with effective research. Dening’s supervisor, Dr. Clive Prestige, said: "With a finding like this, people will naturally be keen to find out when they can try it. Given that the material is generally considered safe and is widely used in food and nutraceutical products, it is feasible that human clinical trials could start reasonably soon." 

Source: Pexels (For representational purposes only)

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