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Comedian Who Played Accidental President On TV, Becomes An Actual One In Real Life!

Comedian Who Played Accidental President On TV, Becomes An Actual One In Real Life!

Ukrainian comedian Volodymyr Zelenskiy, who is known for portraying an accidental President on a TV show actually won the Presidential elections as of late.

A comedian best-known for appearing in a  TV show as a man who coincidentally ends up as the Ukrainian president has actually ended up becoming the real Ukranian President.  Volodymyr Zelenskiy scored a landslide victory in the nation's presidential race on Sunday (April 21), beating incumbent President Petro Poroshenko by about 50 percent of the vote.



 

Zelenskiy, who has no past political experience, announced triumph at a campaign party in Kiev as confetti was shot into the air. Poroshenko admitted defeat on Sunday evening before results began coming in.



 

According to The Guardian, as per the official results discharged yesterday morning (April 21), 41-year-old Zelenskiy had won 73.4 percent of the vote as 85 percent of the vote had been checked. Poroshenko had gotten just 24.4 percent of the vote.



 

Zelenskiy tended to a horde of journalists at his campaign headquarters as the polls shut, accompanied by the theme tune to his TV show, expressing gratitude toward Ukrainian residents for their help and support throughout the campaign. 



 

He said, "We did it together. Thanks to all the Ukrainian citizens who voted for me, and to all who didn’t. I promise I won’t mess up," Zelenskiy is best known for his role in Servant of the People, where he plays a teacher-turned-accidental President. 



 

All through his campaign, the comedian utilized viral recordings, stand-up satire gigs, and jokes instead of conventional campaigning, offering little data about his policies. There were no further insights regarding the same in his brief triumph speech.



 

According to BBC News, Poroshenko, who has been in power since 2014, said the consequence of the election 'leaves us with uncertainty [and] unpredictability,' Poroshenko took to social media not long after losing to state he 'accepts the will of Ukranian people' and affirmed he would not be leaving politics.



 

He wrote, "We succeeded to ensure free, fair, democratic and competitive elections. No doubt that Ukraine has put a new high standard for the democratic electoral campaign. I will accept the will of Ukrainian people," The Guardian reports most voters professed to vote in favor of the 'least bad' alternative, with proper support for either applicant lacking.



 

Zelenskiy's supporters state it is the ideal opportunity for change in Ukraine, while critics question his certifications and express uncertainty about whether he'll have the capacity to confront Russian president Vladimir Putin. Zelenskiy must, as president, face up to the nation's battling economy and the continuous war against Russia-sponsored separatists in the east that has so far claimed in excess of 13,000 lives.

Source: Wikimedia (For representational purposes only)

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